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Child Poverty in the United States 2009 and 2010: Selected Race Groups and Hispanic Origin

The Child Poverty in the United States 2009 and 2010: Selected Race Groups and Hispanic Origin

 http://www.census.gov/prod/2011pubs/acsbr10-05.pdf

INTRODUCTION

Poverty is a critical indicator of the well-being of our nation’s children. Changes in child poverty rates over time can provide an evaluation of a particular antipoverty initiative and help to identify people and groups whose most basic economic needs remain unmet.

Children who live in poverty, especially young children, are more likely than their peers to have cognitive and behavioral difficul­ties, to complete fewer years of educa­tion, and, as they grow up, to experi­ence more years of unemployment.1

HIGHLIGHTS FROM ACS 20102

  • More than one in five children in the United States (15.75 mil­lion) lived in poverty in 2010.
  • More than 1.1 million children were added to the poverty population between the 2009 ACS and the 2010 ACS.
  • The 2010 ACS child poverty rate (21.6 percent) is the highest since the survey began in 2001.
  • Children from all race groups were added to the poverty popula­tion since the 2009 ACS, includ­ing children reported as White (507,000), Black (259,000), Some Other Race (99,000), and children of Two or More Races (160,000).
  • In the 2010 ACS, White and Asian children had poverty rates below the U.S. average. Other race groups had higher rates, including Black children (38.2 percent) and chil­dren identified with Two or More Races (22.7 percent). Poverty for Hispanic children was 32.3 percent.
  • The number and percentage of chil­dren in poverty increased in 27 states from the 2009 ACS to the 2010 ACS.